Thursday, February 16, 2012

Black History Month Activities and a Winning Display!

I am so ecstatic!  My school does a Black History Month contest each year.  Each class chooses a different person to focus their Black History Month lessons around and then creates a display about that person to show their learning.  And guess what?  My class won for Kindergarten!  Sprinkles to my cuties' hard work!  Here are some pics of our display.


Whole Display about Matthew Henson, the first African American to go to the North Pole


Right side of our display, showing some of our arctic animals and a weather map of the North Pole
This side shows arctic hares, narwals, arctic foxes and snowy owls.



Left side of the display, showing more of our arctic animals and photo of Matthew Henson
This side shows polar bears and walruses.


A close up of our dog sleds and igloos
Matthew Henson traveled to the North Pole on Dog sleds and lived in an igloo.  We made the dog sleds by tearing paper for the dog's fur.  My cuties really understood they needed lots of fur to stay warm.  Then they traced their hand to make the sled.  The igloos are made from paper bowls with cotton glued on them.

Here are a few other classes' displays.


 Louis Armstrong


 Mae Jemison


Harriet Tubman


Here are a few pics about our Martin Luther King Jr. study.  We learned this song from Welcome to Room 36.  

 
Then we created these precious mobiles.  I got this idea from Angela at The Daily Alphabet.  It is in her Black History Month Pack on TPT.


Maya's says "I have a dream for kids to be nice."


Zoey's says "I have a dream for the cat to have a home."

Here is a pic of them all hung up in our room.

While we're talking about February, I just had to share one pic of our Valentine's Ladybug Glyphs that I posted here.

So precious!  Have a happy day!

6 comments:

  1. Congrats Erica! Love your display! So cute! Thanks for visiting me! I am your newest follower! Can't wait to see all your cute posts! I love this one! Happy Friday to you! :)
    P.S. If you want help with your comment blog link, email me! :)
    Cheryl
    cener(at)sbcglobal(dot)net
    Crayons and Curls

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey there! You won my giveaway! Will you let me know your email address so I can get it to you? :)
    Vickie

    ReplyDelete
  3. Awww....thank you Erica! I like how you put your own spin on it, and put the writing assignment in the middle. Getting ready to do outs!

    Angela
    The Daily Alphabet

    ReplyDelete
  4. Congrats on winning your display contest..super cute, I can tell you put a lot of work into it! And thanks for trying to help w/my human body unit.

    I am doing something that sounds similar to the project that you described. We are making "anatomy aprons" which is basically a piece of butcher paper folder in half with a hole cut in the center for a kid's head to fit through. They wear the apron like a shirt and glue on each internal body part as we learn about them (lungs, intestines, stomach, etc). I was just looking for some filler stuff for centers or math or something...but it seems hard to come by! Thanks for your comments though!

    Kelly
    Kindergarten Kel

    ReplyDelete
  5. Love your display! Congrats on winning! It looks amazing!

    ReplyDelete
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